Google+

Category: History

British Pantomime: Will Americans Love It, Too?

Pantomime is as much a part of Britain’s time-honored Christmas traditions as plum pudding, mince pies or the fairy atop the tree. In fact, it’s almost impossible to imagine an English Christmas without a performance of Cinderella, Puss in Boots or Jack and the Beanstalk going on in theaters throughout the commonwealth. Without exception, from the West End of London to remote regional towns, people of all ages go the theater to slip back for a few hours into the magic of childhood. They hiss and boo at a giant, clap for Tinkerbell and join in the chorus of...

Read More

Small Town Vibes And The Bonds Of Family In Black Mountain, North Carolina

About 15 miles east of Asheville, North Carolina is a little gem nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains: Black Mountain. Voted ‘Best Small Town In Western North Carolina,’ Black Mountain is famous for its art, crafts, music, and beautiful scenery. But the area is special to me for more personal reasons. Black Mountain (and the unincorporated town of Ridgecrest) is where my maternal grandparents lived for a significant portion of their lives. Our visit this past weekend was a bittersweet one; we were meeting to pay tribute to my grandmother at her memorial service, as she passed away this...

Read More

Top 3 Upgrades to Make Your Classic Car Safe by Today’s Standards

One of the biggest hobbies among car enthusiasts is collecting classic cars. Now some people will buy these classic cars with all the damages with the intent of flipping it and turning it into a nostalgic four-wheeled beauty. Things like new tires, a fresh coat of paint, and fixing the inner workings of the vehicle are a must. Car enthusiasts will give the car these upgrades and enhancements in hopes of selling it at an auction but one thing that classic car flippers don’t want to medal too much with is the integrity of the car… tampering with it...

Read More

Haunted Ozarks at the 1886 Crescent Hotel and Spa in Eureka Springs

The mountainous, quirky little town of Eureka Springs, Arkansas is full of surprises, but one of the most startling is the presence of supernatural visitors. Eureka Springs is home to one of the most haunted hotels in the United States: The 1886 Crescent Hotel and Spa. I personally find ghosts and their stories endlessly fascinating, so I knew I would have to go by and see the hotel for myself. The Crescent has a long and unique history. Originally built in 1886 as a luxury resort for wealthy and famous guests, it quickly became too much to manage and...

Read More

The Most Fashionable Pub Crawl in London: 10 Pubs from Notting Hill to Marylebone

If you find yourself in London wanting to up your Instagram game and get the perfect selfie, we have the trendiest pub crawl for you. This new study outlines the most fashionable pubs, so grab your best friends and family and follow the map we’ve laid out for you–ranking the most stylish places London has to offer and pinpointing the locations on a map. Follow the map and we assure you this will be a bar crawl for the books! Tap in to London’s 10 coolest neighborhoods and it’s trendiest locations. Start at the Convent Garden, and then to...

Read More

Vintage World War II-Era Airplane, The Spirit of Benovia, to Fly from the U.S. to Europe as Part of the “D-Day Squadron”

To Commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Invasion of Normandy To commemorate the 75h anniversary of the Normandy invasion, Joe Anderson, chairman of Benovia Winery and his vintage C-53 Skytrooper airplane, The Spirit of Benovia, will join dozens of World War II-era aircraft in a flight from the United States to Normandy in June. The Spirit of Benovia will join other American aircraft as part of the “D-Day Squadron,” and will rendezvous with a group of British aircraft called “Daks Over Normandy.” Together, the two groups will fly in formation over Normandy on June 6, 2019. To mark the...

Read More

Required Reading for Black History Month: Streetcar to Justice

One hundred years before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, a black schoolteacher named Elizabeth Jennings was violently removed from a segregated streetcar in Manhattan, setting into motion a major civil rights court case in New York City. The story, famous in its day, was all-but-forgotten until HarperCollins published a new book, Streetcar to Justice: How Elizabeth Jennings Won the Right to Ride in New York. The author of the book, Peabody Award-winning journalist Amy Hill Hearth, researched the topic for more than twenty years. Hearth wrote the book, which is...

Read More

Chocolate for Valentine’s Day: The Food of Love?

Shakespeare suggested that music was the food of love, but judging by the tens of thousands of heart-shaped boxes presented to wives and sweethearts on Valentine’s Day, that honor should be shared with chocolate. Not only is chocolate delicious, it has been celebrated as a food that holds the promise of significant health benefits similar to those in red wine and green tea. Like wine and green tea, cocoa beans are rich in flavonoids–phytochemicals (plant compounds) with powerful antioxidant properties. While the research on chocolate’s benefits may be relatively new, it has had a long and distinguished history. Ancient...

Read More

Island Time, Ohio style

Most people, even residents of the Midwest, are incredulous when they hear there are islands in Ohio, I was born and raised in Chicago and I’m embarrassed to admit I knew nothing of their existence. I had to look at a map for proof, but it wasn’t until I actually visited the area that my doubts were dispelled. Known as the Lake Erie Islands, these bodies of land are clustered together in the lake’s western basin, north of Ohio’s mainland. Easily accessible from the metropolitan centers of Cleveland, Columbus and Toledo, they’re regarded as the Jersey Shores of the...

Read More

Unknown Titanic of the Pacific

“For God’s sake, hurry. The water is coming into my room!” (One of the last dispatches from the telegraph operator aboard the Princess Sophia.) S.S. Princess Sophia The steamship SS Princess Sophia was a steel-built coastal passenger liner in the coastal service fleet of the Canadian Pacific Steamship Line. Built in 1911, the vessel was known as a coastal class “pocket liner.” Named after Princess Sophia, granddaughter of Queen Victoria and daughter of Emperor Frederick III of Germany, the ship entered service in 1912 and plied the coastline of British Columbia from Vancouver and Victoria up to Skagway, Alaska as a...

Read More

Rozvadov – The Spiritual Home Of Poker

No one can be sure when gambling first started. It is just known that the ancient Greeks, the Romans, and the Chinese have played games of chance for centuries. In China, evidence has been found of gambling dating back as far as 2300 BC, and in Egypt, dice dating back to 1500 BC have been discovered. Most gambling took place covertly in gambling dens or in the back rooms of saloons, and there was not anywhere designated for this pastime until 1638. Then the local council in Venice opened a building for trouble-free gambling during the carnival season. The...

Read More

VIP Offers

Top Posts

Five Top Luxury Resort Spas In Scottsdale Arizona
How Eyelash Extensions SHOULD Be Done
Last Minute Gourmet Christmas Dinner Menu
Van Gogh Double Espresso Cocktail Recipes
What Are You Renting for the Holidays?
Wine & Food Pairing Guide: Unusual Must-Try Couplings
Paul Bocuse and His Truffle Soup VGE
The Underground Railroad—A Noble Line Indeed

Pin It on Pinterest