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Category: Museums

Thomas Hart Benton’s “America Today” Mural

Thomas Hart Benton’s “America Today” Mural at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Mural painting has come a long way since its first appearance around 30,000 BC, with the famous paintings in the Chauvet Cave in Ardèche department of southern France. As it progressed into modern times, the term “mural” was often associated with the Mexican “muralista” art movement and the renowned artist Diego Rivera. One of the most esteemed muralists in the United States was Thomas Hart Benton (1889–1975), a painter from Missouri, who was at the forefront of the Regionalist art movement. The artist attracted enormous appeal for...

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The Glory That is Greece: From Athens to Mykonos to Santorini

I actually won something wonderful! While years’ of contests and drawings had previously yielded only junky little things, this time the prize was something that was high on my bucket list! A trip for two to Athens and the islands of Mykonos and Santorini. The package, provided by Trafalgar Tours, was called the Greek Island Hopper and included several days in Athens, three days in Mykonos and three days in Santorini. Perfect. Best of all it included transfers, baggage handling and all the annoying details that detract from the pleasures of travel. After the usual red-eye flights, my daughter...

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Neo-Impressionism And The Dream Of Realities At The Phillips Collection

During the late 1800s, painters in Europe were in search of new ways to express themselves. Impressionism was a major movement that came to prominence during the 1870s and 1880s. Shortly thereafter, Neo-Impressionism made its entry. The term “Neo-Impressionism” was coined by French art critic, Félix Fénéon, in 1886 to describe an exciting art movement founded by artist Georges Seurat and his friends. In 1886, Seurat and this new group of artists presented its first exhibition as the Société des Artistes Indépendants (Salon des Indépendants), in Paris. Seurat’s iconic painting, “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande...

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WOMEN FASHION POWER at The Design Museum

Powerful women from past to present, from Coco Chanel to CEOs, as well as those who reign in the worlds of royalty and entertainment, have used fashion to define themselves, represent their unique personalities, and proclaim their positions of authority. Their individual style choices serve as instruments for self-expression. Suffice it to say, fashion is an integral component in the visual language of society. As the title suggests, WOMEN FASHION POWER, an exhibition at the Design Museum in the UK, promises to be electrifying and colorful.  Visitors will take a multi-media journey through the display of historic pieces of...

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History, Art, Beauty, and Fashion Come Alive in NYC Museums

Three compelling New York museum exhibitions reflect the course of history and share a common thread of beauty, fashion and glamour in different ways. The “Gilded Age” at the Museum of the City of New York provides a view of the 19th century lifestyle of the elite in New York, while the “Killer Heels” exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum encompasses decades of styles of high heel shoes. An exhibition of Cubist Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art would not have come to fruition without the 40 year collection of cosmetics mogul Leonard A. Lauder. We know that Cubism...

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The Museum Of Arts And Design Offers An Array Of Beautiful Objects

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), (www.madmuseum.org) is one of my favorite museums in Manhattan. This Museum displays and documents contemporary and historic innovation in craft, art, and design. MAD is the place to go to see what lurks in the creative minds of those creative visionaries who think outside the proverbial box. MAD Has An Ideal Location MAD is located at 2 Columbus Circle, a small, trapezoidal lot on the south side of Columbus Circle, near West 59th Street, between  7th and 8th Avenues. Located a few steps away from Central Park, the neighborhood is a bustling thoroughfare...

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Birmingham And Montgomery, Alabama

Writing about visiting Birmingham and Montgomery, Alabama, with merging history and contemporary times in mind, brought up the quotation by Joss Whedon – “Half of writing history is hiding the truth.” This isn’t happening in Alabama, as its history offered is forthright and exhibited everywhere. This place is full of United States history. In the same way we admire courage in signing the Declaration of Independence, the story in Alabama comes out of similar display of courage and convictions. The parts about what to see on tour, to avoid sugar coating it, are mostly vestiges of murders, Ku Klux Klan...

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Mughal Magnificence: India’s Taj Mahal

I sat in utter amazement, nestled in the back seat while my driver, a Sikh wearing a turban, somehow maneuvered the car through a free-for-all frenzied traffic jam of epic proportions. Seven jumbled lanes of misaligned vehicles squished within three officially marked lines. As far as I could see, no rules of the road existed. A cacophony of honking and beeping horns seemed to simply announce, “I’m here.” Bicycles, rickshaws, motorcycles, hundreds of tiny Tok-Tok three-wheeled cars (occasionally overstuffed with people like clown cars at the circus) plus regular size vehicles, buses and trucks and ox carts vied for...

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“Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs” at Tate Modern

The Artist’s Final Artistic Triumph Henri-Émile-Benoît Matisse (1869–1954) is one of the leading figures of modern art. He was an outstanding draughtsman, print-maker, sculptor, painter and one of the most significant colorists of all time. The artist is recognized as having spurred the Fauvism movement (1904-1908), along with André Derain, which was an intensely emotional style of painting that used a rebellious color palette. A prolific artist whose career spanned more than 50 years, Matisse’s whimsical cut-outs, which he created during the final chapter of his life, are among the most admired and influential works of his entire career....

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Finding Nirvana in Manhattan At The Rubin Museum of Art

The Premier Museum in The West For Himalayan Art New York City, NY beholds an incomparable wealth of cultural and ethnic diversity with art treasures from around the globe. Among its many virtues is providing a home for one of the world’s largest collections of Himalayan art. The Rubin Museum of Art,  which opened in 2004, is the premier museum in the West for Himalayan art and the surrounding regions. This spacious 70,000-square-foot museum, located at 150 West 17 Street, near 7th Avenue in Manhattan, is a treasure trove of spiritual art. Serene intimate galleries showcase ritual sculptures in...

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Holland at Tulip Time

Last April I flew to Amsterdam to visit the tulip fields of Holland.  Unfortunately, spring had been cold and most of the gardens were behind schedule; the bulbs were not yet in bloom. However, Keukenhof, the world’s largest tulip garden with over seven million bulbs, did not disappoint. The 80-acre shrine boasts greenhouses full of exotic species and I understand some of the outdoor gardens have heated installations. Dull corners do not exist; the flowering fields are the essence of springtime. You’ll find no lack of photographers in this ephemeral place. Keukenhof lies about a half hour outside the...

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