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Quintessential Québec

Story by Mary Haban,  Photos by Dale Sanders “Everyday is a fashion show and the world is the runway.” — Coco Chanel Looking our absolute best. For most of us, it doesn’t come without a good amount of effort. From making sure that favorite suit is perfectly pressed, to having shoes impeccably shined, no detail, however small it may seem, goes overlooked. In tourism circles, the same holds true. And no one wears it better than Québec City. Runway Ready If the streets that lined this fashion-forward city were runways, they’d be dressed in Dior and smell of Chanel....

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Ragtop Romance of Mine

When I was really young, I used to know all the automobile models, and would point them out when my parents and grandparents were driving. But somewhere between late high school and early college, my car passion, as it were, turned to convertibles. To be fair, these weren’t just any or all kinds of convertibles. After all, even Volkswagen makes convertible models. No, the objects of my affection were the big, boat-like kind. These were the kind that former auto executive George Romney derided as “gas-guzzling dinosaurs.” My goal was to own one of these in the non-too distant...

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Four Cinderellas: A Delightful Time Warp

Who would’ve thought that today I’d be close to owning four versions on DVDs of the same classic fairy tale—three down, one to go? From the early 1950s, the Disney animated version was first. It was brilliantly drawn, and contained several timeless songs. Two comic tunes were “Cinderella, Cinderella” and “Bippety Boppety Boo.” In 1957 and 1964 there were two TV special versions. Both featured musical scores by Rogers and Hammerstein II, although some of the songs differed. Fourth, still being shown, the latest non-musical version of Cinderella has other aspects to recommend it. The animated version did a...

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Marie Curie—Greatest Female Scientist

Marie Curie  is considered to be the greatest female scientist, and perhaps even more significant, the most inspirational female scientist. Her achievements include being the first female to win a Nobel Prize, the first person to win two Nobel Prizes, the only woman to win prestigious awards in two fields, and the only person to win such awards in multiple sciences Her scientific achievements include formulation of a scientific theory of radioactivity. This involved techniques for isolating radioactive isotopes. She isolated two hitherto unknown elements, polonium in 1898 and pure metallic radium in 1910. Curie was born in Poland in 1867....

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From Hemingway to Cash: Arkansas’ Literary and Musical Past

Arkansas usually is short-shifted when it comes to recognizing cultural geniuses of the past. What most Americans do not realize is that Ernest Hemingway came to Arkansas via his second wife Pauline Pfeiffer. In the 1930s, Pauline’s parent converted the barn on their property into a place where Hemingway could write while visiting. He completed parts of A Farewell to Arms and several short stories here. Johnny Cash and his family moved from Kingsland to Dyess, Arkansas in the 1935, and occupied a house in the Dyess colony through 1953. Arkansas was the influence and roots of his budding beginnings as a musician and singer.

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Jonas Salk: Polio Miracle Worker

Jonas Salk, as an M.D., was interested in research as a virologist, rather than in the actual practice of medicine. And he was willing to take risks to speed up and aid his research and seek outside funding to help his endeavors. This funding took him outside a somewhat sheltered world of academic research and into interaction with various advocacy groups. Born in New York to Russian-Jewish immigrant parents, Salk received his medical degree in the city. He was able to research influenza, where the virus causing the disease had recently been discovered. Both government and medical authorities were...

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Chasing Lewis and Clark with Un-Cruise Adventures

Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, intrepid explorers dispatched by President Thomas Jefferson in the early 1800s to find a route across the western United States, did not have an easy trip. Battling Native Americans, braving extreme heat and cold, making their way down treacherous rapids and starving, they gradually made their way to their ultimate goal: the Pacific Ocean. However, passengers on the luxurious S.S. Legacy with Un-Cruise Adventures are able to traverse part of the same route in ultimate comfort. Un-Cruise Adventures is not a typical small ship cruise company by any means. Drawing on the combined experiences...

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Downton Abbey Visits the Biltmore

Costumes from the popular TV series are on display at America’s largest home.                             Fans of the popular PBS television series Downton Abbey don’t have to travel to Highclere Castle to experience firsthand what life was like at Downton Abbey or to view original costumes of their favorite characters. The Biltmore House, the grand 250-room Vanderbilt estate in Asheville, North Carolina, is showcasing 47 costumes from the show during its exhibition: Dressing Downton: Changing Fashions for Changing Times, which runs from February 5th through May 25th,...

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Spring and Luxe in Amsterdam

You are standing in a springtime garden. As you slowly turn, sunshine blazes on a riot of colors in every direction. Lush beds of tulips, daffodils and azaleas surround you. For eight weeks each year, you can find yourself among seven million tulips on seventy-nine manicured acres at Keukenhof. You probably won’t find Keukenhof in your spell-checker but you will find it less than an hour’s drive outside of Amsterdam in Lisse, South Holland, Netherlands. Keukenkof, which means “Kitchen Courtyard” in Dutch, was originally part of Teylingen Castle, and the wooded land provided food and game as far back as the 15th...

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Door County Fish Boil for Tradition and Taste

Door County, Wisconsin is a pastoral peninsula with Prussian blue waters and verdant woodlands that seem to envelop your spirit and surround your soul. Peace and tranquility are its byproducts, with only the lapping of waves and sounds of seagulls interjecting their refrain. In between the forests and lakes are numerous orchards of Door County’s famous cherry and apple trees — just begging to be picked at their ripeness. With its 298 miles of shoreline, the peninsula can be strangely reminiscent of New England; nevertheless, the county has its own traditions, largely emanating from a Scandinavian heritage, that make Door...

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Bermuda’s Luxurious Escape

“You can go to heaven if you want, I’d rather stay in Bermuda.” — Mark Twain. The alluring island of Bermuda is a British overseas territory, renowned for its warm turquoise blue waters and pristine fine white sand. You can sink your feet into it as you stroll along various stunning beaches that make up the fishhook shaped island’s distinctive shoreline. Bermuda may be petite in size at a mere 22 miles long and approximately a mile across, yet it boasts an array of top notch beaches, fabulous water sports, luxurious hotels and superb dining. The island evokes a longing...

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The Society Queen Who Dethroned Prohibition

Pauline Sabin, the Society Queen who Dethroned Prohibition Throughout history, speeches have been made that served to inspire and stir audiences. In Shakespeare’s play, Augustus inspires listeners to take vengeance on Julius Caesar’s assassins. In England, in 1940, Churchill’s speech, “We shall never surrender,” rallied the British people from seeming defeat by Nazi Germany. In the U.S., on March 4, 1929, a similar emotional reaction occurred, but in the opposite way. In a select audience in Washington, D.C., Pauline Sabin, wealthy socialite and member of the Republican Party National Committee, waited hopefully for the speech of the new President,...

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